Bert Hardy – Do you need an expensive camera….?


I have written blog posts on Willy Ronis, Robert Doisneau, Roger Mayne   and now Bert Hardy. These photographers , who were working in the 40’s and 50’s  were ‘street orientated’ and naturalistic. That is, with their critical eye they ‘found’ images in everyday life and catapulted the ordinary into the extraordinary, in terms of eye catching and interesting images.

Bert Hardy (19 May 1913 — 3 July 1995) was a documentary and press photographer known for his work published in the Picture Post magazine between 1941 and 1957.

berthardy

Bert Hardy rose from humble working class origins in Blackfriars, the eldest of seven children. He left school at age 14 to work for a chemist who also processed photos. His first big sale came when he photographed King George V and Queen Mary in a passing carriage, and sold 200 small prints of his best view of the King. Hardy freelanced for The Bicycle magazine, and bought his first small-format Leica 35 mm. He signed on with the General Photographic Agency as a photographer, then found his own freelance firm Criterion.

In 1938 Hardy became one of the first photographers to use a Leica 35mm camera. After working as a freelance until being recruited by Tom Hopkinson, the editor of Picture Post. Hardy became famous for his photographs of the Blitz .

bert-hardy2girlsbeach

Maidens in Waiting, Blackpool, 1951 (Bert Hardy/Getty)

Having written an article for amateur photographers suggesting that you didn’t need an expensive camera to take good pictures, Hardy staged a carefully posed photograph of two young women sitting on railings above a breezy Blackpool promenade using a Box Brownie in 1951, a photograph which has since become an iconic image of post-war Britain

Chelsea_party__1952_

Chelsea Party 1952

**

Bert Hardy exhibiton

 British sailors taking shore leave on Gibraltar visit the Suiza Bar to watch a Spanish dancer perform. (Bert Hardy/Getty)

**

Street Corner

Royal Wedding Spectator

Wedding Procession -Queen Elizabeth

**

Hardy’s work in the Gorbals area of Glasgow was particularly poignant and reflected his working class origins,as well as his sharp eye.

Bert Hardy exhibiton

Children in the Gorbals, Glasgow, 1948

**

**

gorbalsballoon1948

Gorbals 1948

**

gorbals street1948

Gorbals 1948

**

gorbalsdogs1948

Gorbal’s dogs 1948

**

He photographed other street scenes in other cities…

eastendch1946

Children in the East End of London after the Blitz 1946

**

Bert Hardy exhibiton

Sending children off to the countryside from war ravaged London (Paddington station) 1942

**

Young Evacuee on Train

Young evacuee on train 1942    © Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS

**

Bert Hardy exhibiton

Parson French searching for clothes with a child who was not sent out of London during the war.1940

**

Bert Hardy exhibiton

‘Millions like her…’  Birmingham 1951

**

Bert Hardy exhibiton

Choosing buttons Piccadilly 1953

**

Bert Hardy exhibiton

Too many spivs? 1954

**

More pics in Bert Hardy…2…coming soon.

**

In the mean time -check out this vid

Advertisements

~ by Ray Harris on May 23, 2013.

3 Responses to “Bert Hardy – Do you need an expensive camera….?”

  1. Great photo essay. To your question does one need a expensive camera? I always say the photographer makes the photos not the gear, however, having great gear certainly does not hurt, and in some cases necessary. Can you imagine being a successful bird photographer with a point and shoot. Probably not going to happen.

  2. […] https://photomuserh.wordpress.com/2013/05/23/bert-hardy-do-you-need-an-expensive-camera/ […]

  3. […] blogged about Willy Ronis, Robert Doisneau,Bert Hardy and Roger Mayne, you may have noticed I like street photography, realism, photo journalism, […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: